Alpine Strawberry Tea

“There is something in the nature of tea that leads us into a world of quiet contemplation of life.” – Lin Yutang 6-8 fresh or dried strawberry leaves (Fragaria vesca) 2-3 ripe Alpine Strawberries, slightly crushed Place in tea pot and cover with 1-1 ½ cups boiled,(not roiling) water Steep covered for 10 minutes. Serve in cup with 1 or more Alpine Strawberries Enjoy!

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Peppermint Lavender Tea

“Drink your tea slowly and reverently, as if it is the axis 
on which the world earth revolves 
- slowly, evenly, without 
rushing toward the future; Live the actual moment. 
Only this moment is life.” -Thích Nhất Hạnh Here at the nursery we like to make tea for our guests in the “Tea Room”. We especially like to make tea from ingredients picked fresh from the garden. This summer my ‘signature’ blend has been a simple one: Peppermint Lavender tea. I have found that too much Lavender added to foods can be a bad if not awful thing. After much experimenting I think that 3 heads, and only three, seems… Read More

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Fall seed workshop

Last Sundays workshop, August 26th, on fall seed planting was a wonderful success thanks to the great participation and hands on involvement of all who attended. Thank you! One of the main topics was how to use recyclable materials to create biodegradable seed starting pots (which could also be used for starting plant cuttings). This technique allows for the starting of seeds that would be resistant to or difficult to transplant from traditional plastic pots or seed plug trays: seeds such as beans, corn, peas, nasturtiums, sweet peas and others. Additionally this method serves as an alternative to direct sow methods to protect seed starts from insects and bird predators.… Read More

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Denizens and visitors

To the benefit of all sentient beings… I thought about doing a photo piece on beneficial plants that I grow, but got hung up. The strictest definition in gardening parlance of a beneficial plant is one that benefits the gardener and their plants by attracting creatures, usually insects, that are predatory or parasitic in nature of other creatures deemed “undesirable”, (though sometimes also pollinators). Then at other times some folks feel that plants that attract hummingbirds or butterflies are what constitute “beneficial” plants, and that’s fine too. However when the raccoon or opossum visit at night and taste, borrow, (steal!)  my tomatoes, the coyote munches grapes and plums, or when… Read More

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Gingko biloba, “Tree of Hope”

Maidenhair Tree “Tree of Hope,” Hiroshima, August 6th There are many things I could say about this magnificent, prehistoric tree. Like the fact that it has survived for more than 200 million years, that it once grew all around the world, though now native to only two small areas in China. I could extol its health benefits or usefulness in many landscape settings. But today I want to write about another reason I grow this beautiful tree and offer it in our nursery. On August 6, 1945 the United States exploded the first atomic bomb over the city of Hiroshima, Japan creating devastating destruction and loss of life. In the… Read More

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